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CORONAVIRUS VACCINE: WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR

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Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-Copia-di-REDDITO-MINIMO-2Since the early days of the pandemic, attention has focused on producing a vaccine for COVID-19. With one, it’s hoped it will be able to suppress the virus without relying purely on economically challenging control measures. Without one, the world will probably have to live with COVID-19 as an endemic disease. It’s unlikely the coronavirus will naturally burn itself out.

With so much at stake, it’s not surprising that COVID-19 vaccines have become both a public and political obsession. The good news is that making one is possible: the virus has the right characteristics to be fended off with a vaccine, and the economic incentive exists to get one (or indeed several) developed.

But we need to be patient. Creating a new medicine requires a large amount of thought and scrutiny to make sure what’s produced is safe and effective. Researchers must be careful not to allow the pressure and allure of creating a vaccine quickly to undermine the integrity of their work. The upshot may be that we don’t have a highly effective vaccine against COVID-19 for some time.

ARTICLE WRITTEN BY TIMES OF MALTA

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